Captain Herbert Haddock
- Timeline


1861

27 January

Herbert James Haddock born in Rugby, Warwick

1875 - 1877

August - July

Begins apprenticeship aboard HMS Conway for 2 years

1877

22 June

Made midshipmen in Royal Navy Reserve

1877 - 1880

July - July

Completes 4 year apprenticeship aboard the Horsa, Liverpool

1880

8 February

Made Acting Sublieutenant RNR

1880

17 August

Second Mate certificate passed in London, issued in Liverpool 30th August 1880.

1880 - 1881

19/11 - 14/4

Orion, brig, 1458 tons, reg Liverpool 69385, Third Mate, foreign trade, 4 months 25 days

1881

25/5 - 20/8

Orion, Third Mate, foreign trade, 2 months 25 days

1881 - 1882

15/9 - 27/1

Orion, Third Mate, foreign trade 4 months 12 days

1882

16/2 - 12/5

Mira, Brig, 1668 tonnes, Liverpool reg 70966, Third Mate, 2 months 26 days

16/6 - 11/9

Mira, Third Mate, 2 months 25 days

1882 - 1883

9/10 - 1/1

Mira, Third Mate, 2 months 22 days

1883

31/1 - 4/3

Mira, Third Mate, 3 months 4 days

19/5 - 7/8

Mira, Third Mate, 2 months 18 days

3 September

Passed First Mate Certificate

1883 - 1884

24/11 - 31/2

Mira. Brig, Second Mate, 2 months 20 days

1884

16/3 - 29/5

Mira, Second Mate, 2 months 13 days

5/7 - 27/9

Mira, Second Mate 2 months 22 days

1884 - 1885

11/10 - 4/1

Mira, Second Mate, 2 months 23 days

1885

24/1 - 21/4

Mira, Second Mate, 2 months, 27 days

14/9

Passed Extra Masters exam in Liverpool, address 21 Market Place, Rugby

1886

9/3

Made sublieutenant RNR

1887

8/7 - 19/8

RNR training/service as Acting Lieutenant

1887 - 1888

20/8 - 25/7

RNR training/service as Acting Lieutenant - HMS Edinburgh

1888

August

Joined the White Star Line

6 August

4th Officer - ship unknown

3 October

3rd Officer - ship unknown

1889

18 March

2nd Officer - ship unknown

1890

15 August

Made lieutenant RNR

1891

January

First Officer - ship unknown

1892

March

Chief Officer (Atlantic) - ship unknown

June

1st Officer - ship unknown

December

Chief Officer - ship unknown

1893

February

First officer - ship unknown

13 May

Married Mabel Eliza Bouchette in Rock Ferry, Cheshire.

June

Chief Officer - ship unknown

December

Made commander of the Britannic

1895

10 January

Son Geoffrey was born in Birkenhead

14 March

Geoffrey christened in Rock Ferry

1896

Daughter Ruth born

1896

20 April

Britannic was struck by an enormous rogue wave on a westbound crossing

1898

August

Four members of Britannic's crew were arrested on smuggling charges in connection with a plot to steal $20,000 worth of bonds from the mail

1899

21 April

Captain Haddock of the Britannic reported having endured heavy seas that made it impossible for his ship to communicate with shore.

1899

Captain of the Germanic

1901

March

As Captain of the Germanic, weather was so stormy with a lack of visibility that she was forced to anchor at Sandy Hook and arrived two days late into New York.

August

King Edward VII named Haddock a Commander of Bath, an honour afforded members of the military (and Royal Navy) on special occasions, such as the Coronation, which took place the same month.

1903

11 February

Captain of the Cedric on the maiden voyage

1903

November

A false rumour started in Liverpool that the Cedric had been "sunk in the mid-Atlantic by a collision with the Lamport and Holt steamer Titian.."

1904 - 1907

28 April - 2nd April

RMS Cedric, Liverpool to New York, Master

1904

21 October

Haddock's youngest daughter and son born: Joan Haddock and twin brother Herbert Haddock, at Rock Ferry, Cheshire, England

1905

15 March

Cedric: During a voyage to New York, lasting 11 days, Cedric was struck by three huge waves, estimated as being at least 60 feet in height.

1905

16th March

Baby boy was born in 3rd class to Mrs Sarah Whitney. He was said to have been named Cedric, just like the ship in which he was born on."

1907

5/4 - 12/7

Oceanic, Master, Liverpool to New York

2 June

2am A fire broke out aboard the Oceanic in the unoccupied steerage area while the vessel was docked in New York between voyages. With help from the fireboat McClellan the fire was under control by 2.45am, but the resulting damage totalled more than $10,000.

1907 - 1912

17/7 - 30/3

Oceanic, Master, Southampton to New York

1909

2 January

Saturday: the Oceanic lost a propeller blade. Their arrival into New York was further delayed by dense fog and she didn't reach New York until the 7th of January 1909.

1909

24th of November

Kind Edward conferred officer's decorations of the British Royal Navy Reserve upon Haddock.

1910

February

Haddock involved in an opening ceremony for the new Chelsea piers in New York, with the Oceanic sailing through large ribbons stretched across piers no.58 and 59.

1910

23 November

Haddock in command when the Oceanic struck a coal barge under tow during its arrival in New York. The captain of the barge and his wife were saved while the vessel sank in view of hundreds of Oceanic's passengers.

1911

23 March

Wednesday: the Oceanic was caught in a storm during a Westbound crossing and was struck by lightning, splitting the ship's foremast into pieces which collapsed and narrowly avoided the bridge. First Officer Lightoller was apparently on the bridge at the time.

1912

25 March

Haddock signs on to RMS Titanic in Southampton and then travels to Belfast to join Titanic as her first Captain, preparing the ship for her sea trials.

29 March

Friday: Haddock continues to oversee the mustering of Titanic's crew as seventy-nine firemen and stokers sign on to the new ship for her upcoming sea trials and subsequent voyage to Southampton; welcomes a special party, mostly journalists, invited aboard to inspect the new Titanic before she departed Belfast.

31 March

Sunday: Haddock's final day as Titanic's Captain, handing over to Captain Edward Smith on the 1st of April for Titanic's sea trials.

3 April

RMS Olympic begins its tenth Southampton to New York round trip, with Haddock as Captain.

10 April

Olympic arrives in New York, on the same day Titanic departs on her maiden voyage

13 April

3pm Olympic departs New York under Haddock's command, on her journey eastward towards England

14 April

10.50pm Olympic, west by south 500 miles of the Titanic, hears first distress call heard by Olympic's First Wireless Operator Ernest James Moore

11pm Hears a direct C.Q.D call from Titanic and Moore "answered his calls immediately." Haddock alters course toward her, sends for chief engineer to get up full power

11.10pm Titanic replies and gives position. 41.46 N. 50.14 W., and says: "we have struck an iceberg." Moore reports information to bridge immediately. Distance from the Titanic,: 505 miles.

11.20pm Signals with the Titanic. He says: "Tell captain get your boats ready and what is your position?"

11.35pm Sends message to Titanic: "Commander Titanic, 4.24 a. m. GMT, 40.52 N. 61.18 W. Are you steering southly to meet us?- Haddock."

11.40pm, Titanic says, "Tell captain we are putting the passengers off in small boats."

11.45pm Asks Titanic what weather he had had. He says, "Clear and calm."

11.50pm Message to Titanic: "Commander Titanic, am lighting up all possible boilers as fast as can. - Haddock."

15 April

3am Philip Franklin, vice president in the United States of the International Mercantile Marine Co. sends message to Olympic "Can you get the position of the Titanic? Wire us immediately her position."

5.20am Haddock receives a message from the White Star Line in New York: "Capt. HADDOCK, Olympic: Endeavor communicate Titanic and ascertain time and position, reply as soon as possible to Ismay, New York. F. W. REDWAY."

7.35am "NEW YORK. COMMANDER Olympic: Keep us posted full regarding Titanic. FRANKLIN."

7.45am Haddock replies "To ISMAY, New York: Since midnight when her position was 41.46 north 50.14 west have been unable to communicate, we are now 310 miles from her, 9 a. m., under full power, will inform you at once if hear anything. COMMANDER."

1pm Franklin receives message from Olympic: "Parisian reports Carpathia in attendance and picked up 20 boats of passengers and Baltic returning to give assistance. Position not given... Signed by Haddock."

1.40pm Olympic receives a message that reads: "CAPE RACE AND NEW YORK. WIRELESS OPERATOR, Olympic: We will pay you liberally for story of rescue of Titanic passengers."

2pm Franklin replies to Haddock: "We have received nothing from Titanic, but rumored here that she proceeding slowly Halifax, but we can not confirm this. We expect Virginian alongside Titanic; try and communicate her."

2pm Moore asks for news of the Titanic and receives a reply from the Carpathia's wireless operator Harold Cottam "I can not do everything at once. Patience, please."

4pm Olympic is about 100 nautical miles (190 km; 120 mi) from the Titanic's position, when Haddock receives a message from Captain Rostron of the Carpathia: "Fear absolutely no hope searching Titanic's position. Left Leyland S. S. Californian searching around. All boats accounted for. About 675 souls saved, crew and passengers, latter nearly all women and children. Titanic foundered about 2.20 a. m., 5.47. GMT in 41.16 north. 50.14 west; not certain of having got through. Please forward to White Star - also to Cunard. Liverpool and New York - that I am returning to New York. Consider this most advisable for many considerations. ROSTRON"

4.15pm Olympic tells Carpathia that they would report the information to White Star immediately.

4.35pm Message sent to Cape Race: "ISMAY, New York and Liverpool: Carpathia reached Titanic position at daybreak; found boats and wreckage only. Titanic had foundered about 2.20 a. m. in 41.46 north 50.14 west; all her boats accounted for; about 675 souls saved, crew and passengers; latter nearly all women and children: Leyland Line S. S. Californian remaining and searching position of disaster; Carpathia returning to New York with survivors. Please inform Cunard. "HADDOCK."

4.50pm Olympic sends message: "CAPTAIN Carpathia: Can you give me names survivors; forward? HADDOCK"

5.45pm Receives reply from Carpathia: "Private to Capt. Haddock. Olympic Captain, chief, first, and sixth officers, and all engineers gone. Also doctor, all pursers, one Marconi operator, and chief steward gone. We have second, third, fourth, and fifth officers and one Marconi operator on board."

7.12pm Olympic: "Our position 41.17 north 53.53 west steering east true; shall I meet you and where? HADDOCK." Rostron replied "CAPTAIN Olympic: Do you think it advisable Titanic's passengers see Olympic? Personally I say not. ROSTRON. Carpathia." Before Haddock can reply Rostron then adds: "CAPTAIN Olympic: Mr. Ismay's orders Olympic not to be seen by Carpathia. No transfer to take place. ROSTRON."

20 April

Dawn: Olympic's first port of call, with her flags flying half mast, is Plymouth harbour, at dawn on the 20th of April 1912, running a day late.

1.30pm Olympic arrives at Cherbourg, in a strange coincidence, an hour late just as the Titanic had been 10 days earlier.

21 April

Early hours: Olympic finally reached Southampton and is prepared to be refitted with more lifeboats.

24 April

Wednesday: Olympic is scheduled to depart for New York with 1,400 passengers but due to a last minute mutiny in the stokehold crew, over the quality of the lifeboats, departure is ultimately postponed.

25 April

Haddock calls on assistance from the HMS Cochrane as more crew mutiny

26 April

White Star Line cancels Olympic voyage due to mutiny

30 April

In Plymouth, a court case against the 53 seamen who had deserted the ship after sailing from Southampton, at the Portsmouth Police Court. They are ultimately found guilty.

15 May

Midday: Haddock in command of Olympic finally departs Southampton, with slightly more than 400 passengers aboard (1000 less than during the munity, and the lowest of her career).

22 May

Olympic finally arrives in New York, after many weeks of delay caused by the mutiny

25 May

Captain Haddock interviewed in person aboard the Olympic in New York by Senator Smith as part of the United States Senate Inquiry into the Titanic disaster, along with First Wireless Operator Ernest James Moore

1 June

Near collision when the Olympic almost ran aground on rocks near Land's End. The error was attributed to faulty navigation. Haddock under strict observation for his next few voyages.

6 July

Olympic's steering malfunctioned on departure from New York, as she approached the Statue of Liberty and she runs aground into mud. Within an hour repairs made and continues on journey.

13 September

12.45am Friday: Olympic looses port propellor blade

September

Olympic sent to Belfast for a full safety refit that would last until March 1913.

16 December

RMS Majestic

1913

29 January

RMS Oceanic

1913 - 1914

2/4 - 3/10

RMS Olympic -back aboard the refitted ship

1914

27 October

Olympic races to aid of HMS Audacious which had struck a mine. Haddock launches lifeboats to rescue the crew but could not save the ship. That evening the Olympic is briefly interned as part of a news black out.

November

Haddock appointed command of a "dummy fleet" of warships, based in Belfast

1915

March

"Dummy fleet" begin missions

18 December

According to newspaper reports the "dummy" warships are disbanded.

1916

2 February

Haddock resigns from the White Star Line

17 July

In recognition of his 1914-1915 service with the Admiralty's "dummy" battleship fleet, Capt. Herbert J. Haddock appointed first Royal Naval Reserve Aide-de-Camp to the King, a position he will hold for three years

17 September

Oldest son Geoffrey, a Lieutenant in the Canadian Infantry, 24th Battalion (24th Victoria Rifles), is killed in action in Courcelette, France in the Battle of the Somme.

1917

RNR records list Haddock as "unemployed"

14 May

Haddock is listed aboard the American Line's St Paul, on his way to Newport News, his occupation is listed as "Mariner" and his passage paid for by the Admirality.

31 August

Haddock arrives at New York aboard the Adriatic on his way to Norfolk Virginia, his occupation is listed as "Naval Officer" and the passage is paid for by the White Star Line.

1919

16 July

Commander Charles A Bartlett succeeds Haddock as Aide-de-Camp to King George V.

8 December

Capt. Herbert J. Haddock, C.B., R.D., is placed on the Royal Naval Reserve's retired list.

1920

21 November

Youngest daughter Joan dies aged 17 in a nursing home in Battle, Sussex.

1935

11 March

Wife Mabel passes away aged 64 in Southampton - Haddock is aged 74

1946

4 October

Captain Herbert Haddock dies, aged 85

1958

25th October

Oldest daughter Ruth Haddock dies

1988

13 June

Son Herbert Haddock dies